How can you gain muscle fast|high protein foods for muscle building|fit race

Updated: Jan 21


muscle gain

How can you gain muscle fast If you're looking for quick muscle building, you are at the right bodybuilding blog. Hopefully you will get a best knowledge about bodybuilding its jut you vs you

How long does it take to build muscle?

For some guys, the answer to the exercise question will always be that they're looking to put on muscle. Whether you have a very specific goal, like getting into figure contests and bodybuilding, or you just want to fill out a t-shirt, you have to start somewhere, even if you've always struggled to add and keep weight onto a skinny frame in the past.


Most lean men who can’t gain muscle weight are simply eating and exercising the wrong way,” he says.


Muscle is harder to build and maintain as we age. In fact, most of us start losing muscle around age 30, and physically inactive people can experience anywhere from a 3- to 5-percent reduction in lean muscle mass every decade thereafter This is due to lower testosterone levels in men and lower estrogen levels in women — both hormones that help build muscle — as well as changes in nerve and blood cells and the body not converting amino acids to muscle tissue as efficiently, among other factors. But muscle loss doesn't have to be inevitable


how to build muscle fast


Follow these principles to pack on as much as a pound of muscle each week, especially if you're just starting to train in the weight room.


1.Strength Training and Health

Strength training is an important piece of the fitness equation. Men and women should participate in muscle-strengthening activities that work the major muscle groups (legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms) at least two times each week. Examples of strength training include lifting weights, using resistance bands and doing push-ups, pull-ups, and sit-ups. Even everyday activities such as carrying groceries, playing with your kids and gardening can strengthen muscles.

One of the best ways to support strength building is good nutrition. Protein, carbohydrates and fat play a major role, as does getting enough calories throughout the day. Read on to find out how each macro-nutrient can help you bulk up — and how much to eat every day.


Protein and Muscle Building


  Muscle Building

The more protein your body stores—in a process called protein synthesis—the larger your muscles grow. But your body is constantly draining its protein reserves for other uses—making hormones, for instance.


The result is less protein available for muscle building. To counteract that, you need to “build and store new proteins faster than your body breaks down old proteins,” 

When building muscle, the more protein the better, right? Not necessarily. While you're working to build muscle with exercise, protein should make up 10 to 35 percent of total calories for adults.


Keeping muscle mass, on the other hand, requires a lot less protein than building new muscle. For example, the recommended dietary allowance for protein for the average adult is 0.37 grams per pound of body weight, and that equals about 56 grams of total protein for a 150-pound adult. A typical day that includes 3 servings of low-fat or fat-free dairy plus 3 servings of protein foods (such as lean meat, poultry, fish or beans) will provide quality sources of protein to help reach that goal. Grains, especially whole grains, also provide some protein but may not be enough to meet dietary needs.

high protein foods for muscle building


Protein levels in your conman foods you need in daily basis

3 ounces skinless, baked chicken = 26 grams

3 ounces of lean ground beef = 22 grams

3 ounces grilled salmon = 21 grams

  ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese = 14 grams

1 cup plain low-fat yogurt = 12 grams

½ cup cooked lentils = 9 grams

3 ounces firm tofu = 9 grams

2 tablespoons peanut butter = 8 grams

1 cup cooked quinoa = 8 grams

1 cup low-fat milk = 8 grams

½ cup cooked black beans = 7 grams

1 large egg = 6 grams


Carbohydrates - Muscle Building

Carbohydrates are an important group of foods for fueling your muscles. That's because carbs are partially converted to glycogen, which is stored in muscle to power your workouts. Men and women who are strength training at least twice a week need about half of their calories from carbohydrates per day. That doesn't mean you should be loading up on pizza and bagels. Try adding in good quality carbohydrates that are low in fat, such as whole-grain bread and cereals for the best strength-training boost. Low-fat milk and yogurt and fruits and vegetables also are good options and provide some carbohydrates in our diet. When planning your meals and snacks, it is recommended to stay away from higher fiber foods immediately prior to or during exercise.


Fat - Muscle Building

Your body relies on fat to supply energy to muscles during activity, and how much fat a person needs can vary. As a general guideline, fat should make up 20 to 35 percent of your total calories.

For overall health and muscle strength, focus on sources of heart-healthy fats, including extra-virgin olive oil, canola oil, walnuts, pistachios, almonds, avocados and fatty fish such as salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines, and trout.

Fat contains twice the number of calories as carbohydrates and protein, so it is important to monitor serving sizes. For example, 1 tablespoon of olive oil has 120 calories and 1 ounce of walnuts (about 14 nuts) has 185 calories.


train Your Biggest Muscles

If you’re a beginner, just about any workout will be intense enough to increase protein synthesis. But if you’ve been lifting for a while, you’ll build the most muscle quickest if you focus on the large muscle groups, like the chest, back, and legs.

Add squats, dead lifts, pull ups, bent-over rows, bench presses, dips, and military presses to your workout. Do two or three sets of eight to 12 repetitions, with about 60 seconds’ rest between sets. That rep range will put your muscle cells on the fast track to hypertrophy, the process they use to grow.


Have a Drink First

A 2001 study at the University of Texas found that lifters who drank a shake containing amino acids and carbohydrates before working out increased their protein synthesis more than lifters who drank the same shake after exercising.

The shake contained 6 grams of essential amino acids—the muscle-building blocks of protein—and 35 grams of carbohydrates.

“Since exercise increases blood-flow to your working tissues, drinking a carbohydrate-protein mixture before your workout may lead to greater uptake of the amino acids in your muscles for your shake, you’ll need about 10 to 20 grams of protein—usually about one scoop of a whey-protein powder. Can’t stomach protein drinks? You can get the same nutrients from a sandwich made with 4 ounces of deli turkey and a slice of American cheese on whole-wheat bread. But the drink is better.


“Liquid meals are absorbed faster,” says Kalman. So tough it out. Drink one 30 to 60 minutes before your workout.


Lift Every Other day

Do a full-body workout followed by a day of rest. Studies show that a challenging weight workout increases protein synthesis for up to 48 hours immediately after your exercise session.

Down the Carbs After Your Workout

Research shows that you'll rebuild muscle faster on your rest days if you feed your body carbohydrates.

“Post-workout meals with carbs increase your insulin levels,” which, in turn, slows the rate of protein breakdown, says Kalman. Have a banana, a sports drink, a peanut-butter sandwich.

 Eat Something Every 3 Hours


“If you don’t eat often enough, you can limit the rate at which your body builds new proteins,”

says Houston.


Take the number of calories you need in a day and divide by six. That’s roughly the number you should eat at each meal. Make sure you consume some protein—around 20 grams—every 3 hours

Have Milk Before Bed

Eat a combination of carbohydrates and protein 30 minutes before you go to bed. The calories are more likely to stick with you during sleep and reduce protein breakdown in your muscles, says Kalman.

Try a cup of raisin bran with a cup of skim milk or a cup of cottage cheese and a small bowl of fruit. Eat again as soon as you wake up.

“The more diligent you are, the better results you’ll get,” says Kalman.


The Whey To Go for Muscle Growth

Drink this protein powder shake before every workout.

Weight-gain powders seem like an easy solution to a skinny guy’s problems. After all, they pack as many as 2,200 calories into one serving. But you’re not getting what you pay for.

“High-calorie weight-gain drinks usually get more than 80 percent of their calories from sugar,” says Doug Kalman, R.D. And downing that much sugar can give you an upset stomach and diarrhea.

So, in a sense, you’re flushing good money down the toilet. “You’ll get much better results by spreading your calories throughout the day,” says Kalman.

And by using protein shakes. Look for whey protein powders at nutrition stores. Combine one scoop of the powder with the following ingredients and blend for a homemade muscle-building pre-workout shake:

1 tsp olive or flaxseed oil1/2 c fat-free yogurt1 c grape or apple juice

Stats per shake: 335 calories, 27-gram protein, 45 grams carbohydrates, 6 grams fat







FIT RACE

by Ovii Rajj

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